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Pupil Premium

Pupil premium strategy statement

 

This statement details our school’s use of pupil premium (and recovery premium for the 2021 to 2022 academic year) funding to help improve the attainment of our disadvantaged pupils.

It outlines our pupil premium strategy, how we intend to spend the funding in this academic year and the effect that last year’s spending of pupil premium had within our school.

 

School overview

Detail

Data

School name

St Thomas’ Catholic Primary School

Number of pupils in school

209

Proportion (%) of pupil premium eligible pupils

13.87%

Academic year/years that our current pupil premium strategy plan covers

2021/2022 to 2024/2025

Date this statement was published

December 2021

Date on which it will be reviewed

July 2022

Statement authorised by

Lisa D’Agostini,

Headteacher

Pupil premium lead

Verity Hill

Governor / Trustee lead

Martin Vye, SEN/Pupil Premium Governor

Funding overview

Detail

Amount

Pupil premium funding allocation this academic year

£55145

Recovery premium funding allocation this academic year

£6235

Pupil premium funding carried forward from previous years (enter £0 if not applicable)

£0

Total budget for this academic year

If your school is an academy in a trust that pools this funding, state the amount available to your school this academic year

£61,380

Part A: Pupil premium strategy plan

Statement of intent

At St. Thomas’ Catholic Primary School we pride ourselves on having Christ at the centre of all that we do, that we are aspirational for all of our pupils and that we foster within our children the value of togetherness.  With our pupil premium strategy, we aim that all of our vulnerable pupils, regardless of their backgrounds and the challenges that they face, will achieve well across the entire curriculum and will fulfil their potential.

 

At St. Thomas’ we will always consider the needs of those who are young carers or supported by an early help or social worker regardless of whether they are disadvantaged or not.

 

At the heart of all that we do is high quality teaching, focusing upon the areas that our disadvantaged pupils require the most support in.  We have found that this approach has the greatest impact on closing the disadvantage attainment gap and at the same time will benefit the non-disadvantaged pupils in our school.  It is our intention that non-disadvantaged pupils’ attainment will be sustained and improved alongside progress for their disadvantaged peers.

 

St. Thomas’ approach intends to respond directly to both individual’s needs as well as challenges common to many.  We do not make assumptions about the members of our school community who are disadvantaged; instead, we carefully examine the evidence before us and act accordingly.  We ensure that our whole school ethos means that:

  • all disadvantaged pupils are challenged in the work that they’re set
  • we act early to intervene at the point where need is identified
  • implement a whole school approach in which all staff take responsibility for disadvantaged pupils’ outcomes and raise expectations of what they can achieve

Challenges

This details the key challenges to achievement that we have identified among our disadvantaged pupils.

Challenge number

Detail of challenge

1

Within our school we have, via a variety of assessments and observations, identified that our disadvantaged pupils have underdeveloped and limited language skills as well as a limited vocabulary.  This can been seen from Foundation Stage all the way through to Year 6.

2

Pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds have been identified to have weakened knowledge of phonics in comparison to their classmates, which in turn negatively impacts them as readers.

3

In school data, assessments and observations, book scrutinises and talking with pupils shows us that those in receipt of pupil premium funding have lower levels of writing than that of their peers.

4

Lockdowns and school closure due to the pandemic have negatively affected our disadvantaged pupils to a greater extent than that of their peers which has led to both gaps in learning as well as loss of confidence in their abilities as a learner.

5

There has been a rise in need for emotional support for pupils within our community and this has been seen more so in our disadvantaged children than those without this additional hardship.

Intended outcomes

This explains the outcomes we are aiming for by the end of our current strategy plan, and how we will measure whether they have been achieved.

Intended outcome

Success criteria

Improved language skills and a wider vocabulary among our disadvantaged pupils.

Our assessments and observations will indicate significantly improved language among disadvantaged pupils. This is evident when triangulated with other sources of evidence such as, looking at engagement in lessons, book scrutiny and formative assessment.

Improved phonic knowledge and reading ability among our disadvantaged pupils.

We aim that phonic screening data at Year 2 as well as reading outcomes at the end of KS2 will  show that all of our pupils will meet at least the expected standard.

Improved attainment in writing among our disadvantaged pupils.

We aim that KS2 data will show that all of our pupils will meet at least the expected standard.

Improved engagement and confidence in learning among our disadvantaged pupils.

Pupil voice, engagement in lessons, planning and book scrutiny will show that gaps have been filled and engagement in learning raised.

Improved wellbeing among our disadvantaged pupils.

Pupil and parent voice alongside staff interviews will give us the evidence to see the impact of this approach. 

 

 

 

Activity in this academic year

This details how we intend to spend our pupil premium (and recovery premium funding) this academic year to address the challenges listed above.

Teaching

 

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Teacher employed to work alongside our disadvantaged children to ensure gaps across all areas are plugged and filled.

Bespoke teaching and catch up/intervention programmes have a positive impact upon pupils learning and engagement in learning.

1,2,3,4,5

Purchase of All Aboard to secure stronger phonics teaching for all pupils.

Phonics approaches have a strong evidence base that indicates a positive impact on the accuracy of word reading (though not necessarily comprehension), particularly for disadvantaged pupils:

 

2,3

Rewriting and implementing a whole new, bespoke curriculum that tailors to the experiences and needs of all of our pupils but with a special emphasis upon our disadvantaged learners.

Writing and delivering a curriculum that is relevant and ambitious will not only engage all of our learners but will also make them ambitious for their own futures.  

1,2,3,4,5

Purchase of Sir Linkalot spelling programme

Using a proven and engaging programme will ensure that spelling and writing will have a positive impact upon outcomes for our disadvantaged learners. 

1,2,3

 

 

 

 

 

Targeted academic support

 

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Purchase of targeted programme to identify and support those with limited vocabulary and poor oral skills

Correctly identifying a specific need and then using the correct support from specialists is the way to have a positive impact.

 

1,

Purchase of a targeted programme for those with weaker phonic skills

An Educational psychologist led approach to strengthening phonic skills

2, 3

Additional phonics sessions targeted at the disadvantaged pupils who require further phonic support.

Targeted learning, tailored to individual need has a greater impact as it focuses upon the needs of the individual

2,3

 

Wider strategies

 

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Refurbishment of pupil and parent room

Safe and welcoming spaces where children can be fully relaxed and therefore able to engage in learning are required to get the most promising results from all.

4,5

Solihull parenting group to be run targeting the parents of our disadvantaged pupils.

The Solihull approach is renowned for supporting children’s emotional well being and enabling parents to be supported alongside them.

5

Contingency fund for issues that will arise throughout the year so that they can be addressed immediately.

We are aware that we cannot foresee every eventuality and so need to be able to act immediately to address needs when the arise

1,2,3,4,5

Mindfulness sessions

Our children will need to be ready to learn and able to cope with all of the challenges that life will throw at them. This is especially true of our disadvantaged children and mindfulness will help them develop the tool s that they will need to achieve this. 

1,2,3,4,5

 

Review of outcomes in the previous academic year

Pupil premium strategy outcomes

This details the impact that our pupil premium activity had on pupils in the 2020 to 2021 academic year.

Our own data and internal assessments show that in maths 85% of children from disadvantaged backgrounds at the end of KS2 in the academic year 2020/2021 we were working at the expected standard or above.

Our own data and internal assessments show that in reading 86% of children from disadvantaged backgrounds at the end of KS2 in the academic year 2020/2021 we were working at the expected standard or above.

Our own data and internal assessments show that in writing 85% of children from disadvantaged backgrounds at the end of KS2 in the academic year 2020/2021 we were working at the expected standard or above.

We are very aware that disruptions in learning since the pandemic hit has had a negative impact upon the learning, progress and emotional wellbeing of many of our disadvantaged children and we worked hard to mitigate this by having many 1:1 live learning session across TEAMs in the January lockdown.  We also we rigorous in tracking the engagement of our disadvantaged learners and following up absences with additional live learning sessions.

 

 

St. Thomas’ Catholic Primary School receives Pupil Premium funding from the government to support those children who are in receipt of free school meals (FSM) or who have received FSM in the last six years.  This money is for the school to spend on areas where they can add value to the child’s education as a strong, rounded education is vital to improving life chances.

 

As a school we are focused on improving life chances for our pupils by ensuring that we remove as many barriers to learning as we are able to.  We use our rigorous monitoring and tracking system of all pupils to identify where both gaps in and, barriers to learning exist and plan various intervention strategies to support pupil progress and attainment.  The Pupil Premium money helped us to achieve this by allowing us to access: 

 

The Pupil Premium Grant for the financial year 2021/22 is expected to be £53,730.

 

  • Parent Support Advisor to work with parents to reduce barriers to learning for children

  • Pastoral support for pupils with home issues challenging their readiness to learn in school

  • Homework club – enabling children who might not otherwise have internet access to use our resources to complete homework and research projects

  • All clubs paid for so that full participation in all areas of school life is not dependent upon home income

  • Payment for offsite educational visits ensuring full involvement of all children in learning enhancing activities

  • Counselling services

  • The services of an Educational Psychologist

  • Dyslexia Screening

  • Ongoing staff training to ensure that we reach all of our children when providing an interesting, rigorous and challenging curriculum

  • We are recruiting a teacher to work across the whole school provided targeted and individual interventions.

 

The Pupil Premium Grant for the financial year 2020/21 was £47,005.

 

  • Parent Support Advisor to work with parents to reduce barriers to learning for children.

  • Pastoral support for pupils with home issues challenging their readiness to learn in school.

  • Counselling services.

  • The services of an Educational Psychologist

  • Dyslexia Screening

  • Staff training to ensure that we reach all of our children when providing an interesting, rigorous and challenging curriculum.

  • A teacher to work across the whole school provided targeted and individual interventions.

 

End of Key Stage 2 results May 2019

 

KS2 percentage of Pupil premium pupils who achieved the Expected Level or higher:

 

        Reading Expected Standard+: 87.5% (Nationally:73% )

        Reading High Score: 37.5% (Nationally:27% )

 

        Writing Expected Standard+: 87.5% (Nationally: 78% )

        Writing Greater Depth: 12.5% (Nationally: 20% )

 

        Maths Expected Standard+: 87.5% (Nationally: 79% )

        Maths High Score:25% (Nationally:27%)

 

        GPS Expected Standard+: 75% (Nationally: 78% )

        GPS High Score:25% (Nationally:36%)

 

 

      There were 8 children out of cohort of 30 who qualified for Pupil Premium funding. 

 

(National figures are for non-disadvantaged children.)

 

End of Key Stage 1 results May 2019

 

        Reading Expected Standard+: 50% (Nationally: 74.9%)

        Writing Expected Standard+: 50% (Nationally: 69.2%)

        Maths Expected Standard+: 75% (Nationally: 75.6%)

 

 

In 2017/2018 the school  received £38,070. 

 

We plan to use this money in the following areas to add value to pupil premium children:

  • Salary of one teacher with a special focus on Pupil Premium children,
  • Salary of the Parent Support Advisor,
  • Expenses for Pupil Premium children participating in educational visits and extra-curricular clubs on school site.

 

End of Key Stage 2 results May 2018

 

KS2 percentage of Pupil premium pupils who achieved the Expected Level:

 

Reading: 85.7% (Nationally:75% )

 

Writing: 85.7%% (Nationally:78% )

 

Maths: 85.7% (Nationally:76%)

 

Grammar, Punctuation & Spelling: 42.9% (Nationally:78% )

 

 

There were 8 children out of cohort of 30 who qualified for Pupil Premium funding. 

 

National figures are for non-disadvantaged children.

 

End of Key Stage 1 results May 2018

 

None of our children sitting Key Stage One SATs qualified for Pupil Premium Funding 

 

 

St. Thomas’ received £58,680 Pupil Premium money for the financial year 2016-2017

The school used this money in the following areas to add value to pupil premium children:

  • Salary of one 0.75 FTE Key Stage 1 teacher with a special focus on Pupil Premium children
  • Salary of one 0.75 FTE Key Stage 2 teacher with a special focus on Pupil Premium children,
  • Salary of the Parent Support Advisor,
  • Expenses for Pupil Premium children participating in educational visits  and extra-curricular clubs on school site.

End of Key Stage 2 results May 2017

KS2 percentage of Pupil premium pupils who achieved the Expected Level:

 

Reading: 60% (National benchmark: 77%)

 

Writing: 90% (National benchmark: 81%)

 

Maths: 80% (National benchmark: 80%)

 

Grammar, Punctuation & Spelling: 80% (National benchmark: 82%)

 

 

There were 10 children out of cohort of 30 who qualified for Pupil Premium funding. From this group, one child did not take the SATs as he had not been in the country long enough to qualify to sit them. All of the percentages are based upon the 10 Pupil Premium children.

National benchmark figures are for non-disadvantaged children.

 

 

End of Key Stage 1 results May 2017

KS1 percentage of Pupil premium pupils who achieved the Expected Level:

 

Reading: 80% (National benchmark: 79%)

 

Writing: 80% (National benchmark: 72%)

 

Maths: 80% (National benchmark: 79%)

 

Science 100% (National benchmark: 86%)

 

 

There were 5 children out of cohort of 29 who qualified for Pupil Premium funding.

National benchmark figures are for non-disadvantaged children.

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